Thursday, October 23, 2014

Missed a kaddish at maariv

Hi,

In the maariv evening service, the chazan is supposed to recite a half-kaddish before beginning the amidah. However, this half-kaddish is not a firm requirement. Therefore, if the chazan forgets the half-kaddish and begins the amidah, there is no corrective; the service proceeds from there.

(Rivivot Ephraim 1:175:1)

Have a great day,
Mordechai

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Hecha Kedushah, expanded

Hi,

Expanding on this recent Jewish Law post:

What is hecha kedushah, and how is it conducted?

When time is short, such as at minchah when sunset is near, a minyan may abbreviate the davening by having the chazan recite the amidah first, through kedushah, and then having the community complete the amidah silently. This is called hecha kedushah, a Yiddish term meaning "loud kedushah".

There are multiple views regarding how the pre-kedushah portion of the amidah should be recited. The two most common practices in contemporary Ashkenazi minyanim are:
  • The minyan recites the first three berachot silently along with the chazan's loud recitation, responds to kedushah, and then concludes the amidah silently.
  • The minyan listens to the first three berachot and responds "Amen", responds to kedushah, and then recites the entire amidah, from the beginning, silently.

Rabbi Yosef Dov Soloveitchik practiced the former approach, but the latter approach seems to be the more widespread practice.


(Shibolei haLeket 47; Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 124:2, 232:1; Pri Megadim Orach Chaim 124:Eishel Avraham 5; Kaf haChaim Orach Chaim 124:2 and footnote 10; Aruch haShulchan Orach Chaim 232:3-6; Mishneh Berurah 124:8, 232:4; Rivivot Ephraim 1:166:2; Az Nidbiru 12:23)

Have a great day,
Mordechai

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Mixing up Shabbat and weekday texts for Hashkiveinu

Hi,

One of the pre-amidahs blessing of the evening maariv service, Hashkiveinu, has different endings for Shabbat/holidays and weekdays. However, both endings fit the format of the blessing. Therefore, one who uses the wrong ending for that particular day has fulfilled the obligation and need not repeat the blessing.

(Rivivot Ephraim 1:174)

Have a great day,
Mordechai

Monday, October 20, 2014

Barchu, then Minchah?

Hi,

One who comes to shul in the evening and finds the minyan beginning an early maariv with Barchu may respond and then daven minchah afterward, if this is a weekday. However, one may not do so on Friday night, as he will have accepted Shabbat by responding to Barchu.

(Rivivot Ephraim 1:172)

Have a great day,
Mordechai

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Pausing before re-starting the amidah

Hi,

Normally, one must wait at least several seconds between one amidah and another, per Berachot 30b and Tosafot there. However, one who realizes that he missed a key part of the amidah, such as Yaaleh v'yavo, so that he must start again from the beginning, need not wait at all.

(Rivivot Ephraim 1:170)

Have a great day,
Mordechai

Monday, October 13, 2014

Making up Pesukei d'Zimra

Hi,

One who misses the morning shacharit prayer due to a reason other than carelessness recites the amidah for minchah twice. The second amidah counts as the morning shacharit amidah, but one does not precede it with the pesukei d'zimra paragraphs which would have been used as part of shacharit.

One who misses pesukei d'zimra may recite its paragraphs at any point during the day, but one would not recite the beginning and ending blessings.

(Rivivot Ephraim 1:169)

חג סוכות שמח,
Mordechai

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Buiral on Chol haMoed Succot

Hello,

When a person is buried during chol hamoed of Succot, Shemini Atzeret counts toward only one day of the 30 days of shloshim, not as seven days like a full Yom Tov.

(Rav Moshe Feinstein, Igrot Moshe Yoreh Deah 1:256)

Have a good day,
Mordechai